When Life gets Hard

So this blog is a little different from the usual.

I just wanted to write a little update on the house. We had arranged for a buyer to move in on the 26th of February, we had sold the house! However, unfortunately the buyer pulled out. I know these are the kind of things you are supposed to expect when selling a house and it is unpredictable, you’ve just got to ride the wave yo.

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However, to be so close to completing something and literally be touching the goal and then to have it fall apart right at the finish line is a little bit crushing.

It has been a hard start to 2020. I went to Glasgow yesterday to see my bestie and we had a great time, so that lifted my spirits. We tried (failed) to make pancakes and drank a lot of alcohol before I crashed on the sofa.

Then the next day we visited George Square, the Lighthouse, Buchanan Street and Paesano’s Pizzeria! (was a good pizza 10/10)

 

View from the Lighthouse attraction, Glasgow

But anyways, I hope it sells soon, I want my new car 😦

 

 

Procurement Types 3

Management Contracting

Management contracting can be known as an overlapping procurement system as the design, construction and tendering all overlap. This strategy is suited to more complex projects with accelerated commencement and completion.

The contractor is involved from the start of the design and is responsible for the integrated design and construction phase, the contractor offers the client a consultant service, based on a fee, for coordinating, planning, controlling and managing the design and construction.

Management contracting puts the contractors experience to use from the start, in the concept and design phase through to the construction, they advise the employer on the buildability of the design, plan the construction and discuss cost estimates. Contractor is responsible for tendering parcels of work and negotiating subcontracts with subcontractors (known as works/trade contractors). After client approval, management contractor enters contracts with the works contractors. The contractor manages the project for a lump sum or percentage fee, meanwhile the client has no contractual link with the subcontractors, however this leaves them vulnerable to the contractors’ failures.

Management Contract  normally follows three phases:

  1. Pre-appointment of the MC – After the initial design and feasibility have been arranged, employer invites offers from MCs
  2. Pre-construction period – during this time, the MC will help the design team by offering certain services such as advising on buildability/construction methods, etc.
  3. Construction period – the MC organises and co-ordinates the project, supervises the work and monitors cost.
Advantages
  • time saving potential for overall project duration by using construction packages and overlapping design and construction stages.
  • cost reduction potential by using competition to let work packages and by using value engineering efficiently § Friendly relationship – design and construction
  • late changes more easily accommodated
  • design team are under the clients control throughout the project
  • client has control over selection of trade contractors
  • liked by knowledgeable/experienced clients
Disadvantages
  • no cost certainty prior to commencement of work on site, or in fact until completion
  • needs informed client, able to take an active part in the process
  • design of later packages may affect work already completed on site leading to abortive additional costs
  • individual direct contracts with package trade contractors – no single point responsibility for their performance or quality of their design/workmanship
  • greater administration for the client
  • client takes responsibility for design team performance
  • client carries risk of the effects of non-performance by trade contractors, their financial failure
Construction Management

Like Management Contracting, this strategy is also used on more complex projects, construction management’s primary difference from MC is: Employer places a direct contract with each of the specialist trade contractors. This means that more experienced clients like construction management as they have more responsibility over the trade contractors and the construction manager is only liable for negligence, by failing to perform role with reasonable skill and care (unless greater liability is incorporated in the contract).

Advantages
  • time saving potential for overall project duration by using construction packages and overlapping design and construction stages.
  • Cost reduction potential by using competition to let work packages and by using value engineering efficiently
  • Friendly relationship – design and construction
  • Continuous coordination between the design and construction processes
  • late changes more easily accommodated
  • design team are under the clients control throughout the project
  • design team are managed by the CM
  • client has control over selection of trade contractors
  • liked by experienced clients
Disadvantages
  • no cost certainty prior to commencement of work on site, or in fact until completion
  • needs informed client, able to take an active role in the admin. of the process
  • design of later packages may affect work already completed on site leading to additional costs
  • individual direct contracts with package trade contractors – no single point responsibility for their performance or quality of their design/workmanship
  • greater administration for the client
  • client takes responsibility for design team performance
  • client carries risk of the effects of nonperformance by trade contractors, their financial failure No guarantee by the construction manager for total cost, time or quality of works. The owner has high risk.

 

In Other News

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Unfortunately, the lady that was due to be moving into the house at the end of the month has pulled her offer out and so the house is back on the market. 😦 sad times!

Procurement Type 2

Design and Build 

The procurement process ‘Design and Build’ is an integrated procurement process, meaning that the design and construction phases can overlap. Differing from the traditional process (described in my last post), the responsibility of the design and the construction lies mainly with the contractor as opposed to the client. The client and the contractor are tied together through a single contract however the client may hire a project manager to protect their interests. This type of procurement system would be reimbursed through a fixed lump sum or a GMP (Guaranteed Maximum Price). The risks undertaken in a design and build contract are carried by the contractor which usually safeguards the client. This route is good for time constrained projects because the design and construction phases are integrated.

 

There are 4 Design and Build options:

1. Develop and Construct 2. Novated Design and Build 3. Package Deal 4. Turnkey

  1. Develop and Construct

Where the client appoints the design team and the detail they achieve varies as the contractor is responsible for the development of the design, going into more detail before submitting bid proposals. Design normally progressed to outline planning stage and possibly to full planning approval point and then the client can invite competitive tenders based on a detailed project concept. This process still requires one organisation to take responsibility for design and construction of the project

  1. Novated Design and Build

Client appoints consultants to carry out the conceptual design and tender document. Once the contractor has been appointed, the client transfers the design team to the successful bidder to carry out the detailed design. The contractor takes on responsibility for the design work carried out to date, sometimes together with the original design team. The consultants’ fees are normally predetermined by the client. Some designers resist this practise because the contractors and consultants may have a conflict of interests.

  1. Package Deal

A package deal is used for repetitive projects whereby projects are relatively simple. The client would need to be relatively flexible. You would gain a complete ‘off the shelf’ product but it would probably be quite a standard design.

  1. Turnkey

A contractor is responsible for overseeing absolutely everything and at completion it would just be a case of handing it over. This is used in more complex projects and is also known as EPC.

Design and Build Advantages
  • The client has only to deal with one firm, giving single point responsibility
  • Benefits from the contractor’s experience during design
  • Friendly relationship between the design team and the construction team (not adversarial as in traditional)
  • Price certainty before construction starts, provided the ERs are adequately specified and changes are not introduced
  • Reducing the project duration by overlapping design and construction phases.
  • The total cost may be reduced by reducing changes to minimum due to early collaboration between designers and constructors
Design and Build Disadvantages
  • Difficulties in preparing comprehensive brief or set of ERs.
  • Client commitment to a concept design at an early stage; often before the detailed designs are completed.
  • Bids are difficult to compare different design solutions, proposals and programmes.
  • No design evaluation: unless consultants are appointed
  • Client changes can be expensive: no BOQ, no competition
  • Design liability is limited by the standard contracts available.
  • Quality may be compromised as the client relinquishes control to the design and build contractor.
  • Total cost may be increased due to higher risks transferred to contractor
close up photo of dog wearing sunglasses

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House Renovation

Since May last year, my father and I have working hard renovating a £86,000 property.

This month, we completed the work, put it on the market and sold it.

It all happened so quickly…

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First thing we did was replace the windows with double glazing…

Next, we moved the door of the bathroom from the left to the right and we fitted the bathroom suite…

Then we started decorating the upstairs bedrooms…

Meanwhile, Dad knocked down the wall between the living room and kitchen…

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Before we designed and booked our blue kitchen design…

Dad built a small downstairs toilet…

 

The upstairs bedrooms were finished…

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pre_load_imgAnd the kitchen fitted…

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Carpets, flooring and bricking up the old porch…

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And then it was a case of finishing up the little jobs. I’ll attach some more photos into the Gallery of my website, feel free to have a browse.

 

Can’t believe it’s sold already, time to say goodbye. But hopefully another one will be on the agenda soon 🙂 🙂

Laura

Blog Challenge 2.2 – Budget and Cost

“A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went”
For those who may not already know, I have been renovating a property for the past 6 months and at the beginning of the venture I challenged myself to write 4 blog posts on different topics. Now that the house is nearing completion, I have decided to review the process and redo the blog challenge!
I previously wrote a reflection piece just outlining our progress and this week I am going to be writing about the budget.

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So, rewind back to May 2019, I had written my blog post highlighting my expectations for the house and had just been given the keys. We purchased the property for £86,500 and I commented in my blog that we aimed to spend roughly £105,000 in total, so just shy of £20,000 for the restoration. I’ve been keeping good track on receipts and have tallied up nearly all of our expenditure right up to the end of October. However, I am missing receipts for a couple things that we purchased online like the oven, so I would say my record could be out by no more than £1,000, and adding to this, we still haven’t paid the plumber or electrician! But I aim to do another progress report once we have gathered all the costs up, I am not looking forward to scouring receipts and payments!!
Here is the chart I created at the start of the project:

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1st Estimate Finance Chart

I have changed the colours but kept the same numbers, so it is still the same chart.
And this is where we are at now:

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6 Month Rough Spend

I have a little note pad where I record every receipt, I write item bought, the price and the date, if there are multiple products on one receipt, I tend to just label it generically i.e. plumbing equipment, tools, etc. I wish I had been a bit more detailed though because when I came to make this chart it became really difficult to split some receipts into categories as there would have been items bought that went into different areas, so I excluded them from this chart. So, the chart above is just a ballpark figure currently.

According to my records we have spent £99,912 but considering that I haven’t recorded the boiler or cooker yet, we are probably about £100,912. All that we really have left to buy is flooring and of course pay the plumber and electrician so it wouldn’t be too shabby if we finished at around £107,000; £2,000 over our initial budget. In addition to this, we had a rough evaluation a couple of weeks ago to ensure we were not over-spending and the evaluator recommended putting it on the market at £145,000-150,000, so a £38,000 gross profit would be tiddddy.

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Just to quickly debrief my estimates, comparing both charts it’s clear to see that some areas were quite close to my guess, but some were way off the mark. The roof was a pleasant surprise, after gaining a couple of opinions it was confirmed that the roof was dandy and needed little repair work, the money we have spent on it was mostly on replacing the guttering.

The kitchen segments are similar, I set a price of £3,000 in total for the kitchen which we just about reached but not quite, #winning. The bathroom was supposed to be £500 for the main suite and £500 to construct and install a brand new ensuite but we decided to not go through with those plans and instead put a little WC downstairs in the utility cupboard, with just a sink and toilet it fits nicely in there and in budget too – even better!
Also, I have added fees into the updated chart as I didn’t think about the solicitor’s fees and taxes we would be paying. Luckily, we get a discount on council tax due to the property being empty but we haven’t included what we have paid in council tax on the chart yet as I haven’t gotten around to adding it up. The structural changes on the graph have mainly consisted of knocking down the dividing wall between the kitchen and dining room and replacing it with a steel beam and this cost roughly £600. I haven’t included the porch on the new graph because all that my dad did was remove the horrible wooden cladding and brick it up to the roof that it already had using the bricks that had been knocked out of the wall inside, love a bit of recycling ❤ also, we added a window and door to it but those are included in the doors and window category.

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All in all, it’s going well in terms of budget. Hopefully, the only categories to grow before we finish will be the decorating one, the fees (from the sale), the plumbing and electrics. So happy with the project so far and will be a little bit sad to see it go, but I’m sure the pay day will cheer me up… If all goes to plan after all!!